Sage – Allergy Resources

Sage is a plant in the Lamiaceae family which contains lots of edible herbs such as mint, basil and thyme.

Sage is rarely linked to food allergy, to date there are no recorded allergens for sage by the World Health Organization (WHO), because there have not been enough study into allergic effects from this food. If you are interested in what is needed by the WHO before they add an allergen to their allergen database you can check that out HERE.

I have put together some more comprehensive resources at http://www.allergyresources.co.uk/Sage.php

The allergy resources page for sage allergy covers the key allergens, which allergic syndromes are linked to this allergy and other foods which are commonly cross reactive with sage.

There is also regularly updated links to useful websites specifically for sage allergies and the latest research papers on the topic.

If you have multiple allergies and are interested in how they are linked or want to find out more about food allergies outside the usual top 14 then you can follow me on Facebook, Instagram or Twitter, where I share a food allergy card every week.

Thyme – Allergy Resources

Thyme is a plant in the Lamiaceae family which contains lots of edible herbs such as mint, basil and sage.

Thyme is rarely linked to food allergy, to date there are no recorded allergens for thyme by the World Health Organization (WHO), because there have not been enough study into allergic effects from this food. If you are interested in what is needed by the WHO before they add an allergen to their allergen database you can check that out HERE.

I have put together some more comprehensive resources at http://www.allergyresources.co.uk/Thyme.php

The allergy resources page for thyme allergy covers the key allergens, which allergic syndromes are linked to this allergy and other foods which are commonly cross reactive with thyme.

There is also regularly updated links to useful websites specifically for thyme allergies and the latest research papers on the topic.

If you have multiple allergies and are interested in how they are linked or want to find out more about food allergies outside the usual top 14 then you can follow me on Facebook, Instagram or Twitter, where I share a food allergy card every week.

Quinoa – Allergy Resources

Quinoa is a plant in the Amaranthaceae family of plants. This family of plants also includes spinach, sugar beets and chard. Quinoa is often thought as a cereal, but is in fact the dried seed of the Chenopodium plant.

As it is NOT a cereal it doesn’t contain any gluten, so is suitable for consumption by coeliacs.

The World Health Organizaion (WHO) does not have any recorded allergens for quinoa, but it is thought to contain 2S seed storage proteins7S seed storage proteins and 11S seed storage proteins. These are proteins more commonly found in nuts, seeds and legumes than in grain. More research is being done to see if quinoa also contains profilin and oleosin proteins.

I have put together some more comprehensive resources at http://www.allergyresources.co.uk/Quinoa.php

The allergy resources page for quinoa covers the key allergens, which allergic syndromes are linked to this allergy and other foods which are commonly cross reactive with quinoa.

There is also regularly updated links to useful websites specifically for quinoa allergies and the latest research papers on the topic.

If you have multiple allergies and are interested in how they are linked or want to find out more about food allergies outside the usual top 14 then you can follow me on Facebook or Twitter, where I share a food allergy card every day of the week.

Basil – Allergy Resources

Basil is a plant in the Lamiaceae family which contains lots of edible herbs such as mint, thyme and sage.

Basil is rarely linked to food allergy, to date there are no recorded allergens for basil by the World Health Organization (WHO), because there have not been enough study into allergic effects from this food. If you are interested in what is needed by the WHO before they add an allergen to their allergen database you can check that out HERE.

I have put together some more comprehensive resources at http://www.allergyresources.co.uk/Basil.php

The allergy resources page for basil covers the key allergens, which allergic syndromes are linked to this allergy and other foods which are commonly cross reactive with basil.

There is also regularly updated links to useful websites specifically for basil allergies and the latest research papers on the topic.

If you have multiple allergies and are interested in how they are linked or want to find out more about food allergies outside the usual top 14 then you can follow me on Facebook or Twitter, where I share a food allergy card every day of the week.

Nutmeg – Allergy Resources

Nutmeg is a spice in the Myristicaceae family of plants. The spice is made from the brown seed kernel inside the fruit pit of the plant. The spice mace is made from the same plant, but is from the red or purple lacy covering on the pit. If allergic to one, you would likely be allergic to the other.

Nutmeg is NOT a nut, so does not have to be avoided if you are allergic to tree nuts or peanuts.

Nutmeg contains isoeugenol which is a chemical compound which can cause contact allergies – it is found in nutmeg oil which can be added to foods and cosmetics for flavour or fragrance.

I have put together some more comprehensive resources at http://www.allergyresources.co.uk/Nutmeg.php

The allergy resources page for nutmeg covers the key allergens, which allergic syndromes are linked to this allergy and other foods which are commonly cross reactive with nutmeg.

There is also regularly updated links to useful websites specifically for nutmeg allergies and the latest research papers on the topic.

If you have multiple allergies and are interested in how they are linked or want to find out more about food allergies outside the usual top 14 then you can follow me on Facebook or Twitter, where I share a food allergy card every day of the week.

Food Allergy: Non IgE Mediated Allergies

What are they?

Immunoglobulin E (IgE) is an antibody present in the blood, usually in small concentrations. When triggered by an allergen (usually proteins in certain food) the body releases antibodies to fight what it thinks are offending cells. This leads to an immediate increase in histamine levels in the body and the classic allergic reactions (such as inflammation of the face and limbs and anaphylaxis). This reaction can be measured by blood tests as there will be an increase of IgE levels in the blood; these are known as IgE allergies.

In non-IgE allergies the person suffers with some of the same symptoms, but does not make IgE antibodies against the allergens. There can be a delayed reaction of up to 72 hours after ingestion of the offending food, which means that it is often hard to pinpoint which food is causing the reaction (especially as so much of what we eat nowadays is processed and contains so many ingredients).

If you want to read more on the topic and access all the additional resources check out my website at – www.allergyresources.co.uk/Non-IgE.php

The majority of my posts are no longer on WordPress – follow me on  Facebook, Instagram  or Twitter if you don’t want to miss my monthly round-ups or allergy card updates!

Jemma


Fruit Allergies – Allergy Resources

Fruit allergies are relatively common, but there is a lot less information about them as they are not easily defined and categorised. Here we aim to provide more information on the different allergenic proteins which may be the cause of allergic reactions to fruits.

For the purposes of this blog post we are defining fruit as “… the product of a tree or plant which contains seeds and can be eaten. These are generally sweet and fleshy.”

Fruit allergies can generally be split into three categories.

1 – Fruits causing mild “Oral Allergy type” symptoms
2 – Fruits with seeds causing severe allergy symptoms due to cross reactivity
3 – Fruits which contain other panallergens and can cause allergic symptoms from mild to severe.

Read the rest of the blog post here http://www.allergyresources.co.uk/Fruit.php

Persimmon Fruit – Allergy Resources

Persimmon fruit (also called kaki fruit, persimon and sharon fruit) are in the Ebenaceae family of plants.

The main allergens in persimmons are profilin proteins, which are panallergens responsible for more severe allergic reactions in seemingly unrelated food.

Persimmon fruit also contain Bet v 1-like proteins. These proteins are similarly shaped to those ones in birch pollen and can cause oral allergy type symptoms.

I have put together some more comprehensive resources at http://www.allergyresources.co.uk/Persimmon.php

The allergy resources page for persimmon fruit covers the key allergens, which allergic syndromes are linked to this allergy and other foods which are commonly cross reactive with persimmons.

There is also regularly updated links to useful websites specifically for persimmon fruit allergies and the latest research papers on the topic.

If you have multiple allergies and are interested in how they are linked or want to find out more about food allergies outside the usual top 14 then you can follow me on Facebook or Twitter, where I share a food allergy card every day of the week.

Paraben Allergy

Parabens are a chemical preservative used in a multitude of different products, but most commonly associated with hair and skin products and medications.

They are very effective as antifungal and antibacterial agents to give products a longer shelf life, but unfortunately can act as an irritant in some people and can cause contact allergic reactions. Parabens are more commonly shown to irritate the skin after it has already been inflamed by another allergen. This is called the ‘Paraben Paradox’.

They have low toxicity compared to other preservatives and rarely cause allergic reactions from being ingested (in the form of medications).

Read the rest at ALLERGY RESOURCES.

The majority of my posts are no longer on WordPress – follow me on  Facebook , Instagram or Twitter if you don’t want to miss my monthly round-ups or allergy card updates!

Jemma


Poplar Pollen – Allergy Resources

There is only one pollen allergen associated with poplar pollen, it is an allergen associated with airways. Poplars are in the same genus of trees as cottonwood.

Pop n 2 is a profilin protein, these are panallergens and can cause allergies across multiple species of plants and foods.

Propolis is the glue made by bees to build and repair their hives. In Europe the most common tree buds used by bees to make propolis are from the Poplar tree. Propolis is a mixture of tree waxes and resins, balsam, essential oils, pollen and other vitamins and minerals.

I have put together some more comprehensive resources at http://www.allergyresources.co.uk/Poplar.php

The allergy resources page for poplar pollen covers the key allergens, which allergic syndromes are linked to this allergy and other foods which are commonly cross reactive with poplar pollen.

There is also regularly updated links to useful websites specifically for poplar pollen allergies and the latest research papers on the topic.

If you have multiple allergies and are interested in how they are linked or want to find out more about food allergies outside the usual top 14 then you can follow me on Facebook or Twitter, where I share a food allergy card every day of the week.

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