Aniseed Allergy Resources

Aniseed is a spice, also known as anis. As a very rare allergy it is not well studied and there has been no confirmation of which allergens are causing the reactions.

Allergic reactions are most likely to be caused by Bet v 1-like proteins, which cause reactions in people sensitised to birch tree pollen and give oral allergy type symptoms.

I have put together some more comprehensive resources at http://www.allergyresources.co.uk/Aniseed.php

The allergy resources page for aniseed covers the key allergens, which allergic syndromes are linked to this allergy and other foods which are commonly cross reactive with aniseed .

There is also regularly updated links to useful websites specifically for aniseed allergies and the latest research papers on the topic.

If you have multiple allergies and are interested in how they are linked or want to find out more about food allergies outside the usual top 14 then you can follow me on Facebook or Twitter, where I share a food allergy card every day of the week.

Cumin Allergy Resources

Allergic reactions are most likely to be caused by Bet v 1-like proteins, which cause reactions in people sensitised to birch tree pollen and give oral allergy type symptoms.

Another suggestion is that plants in the Apiaceae family contain profilin proteins which can cause allergic reactions in uncommon circumstances.

I have put together some more comprehensive resources at http://www.allergyresources.co.uk/Cumin.php

The allergy resources page for cumin covers the key allergens, which allergic syndromes are linked to this allergy and other foods which are commonly cross reactive with cumin.

There is also regularly updated links to useful websites specifically for cumin allergies and the latest research papers on the topic.

If you have multiple allergies and are interested in how they are linked or want to find out more about food allergies outside the usual top 14 then you can follow me on Facebook or Twitter, where I share a food allergy card every day of the week.

Cucumber Allergy Resources

None of the allergens in cucumber have been recognised by the World Health Organisation, but it thought that the allergen responsible for causing allergic reactions are similar to proteins found in ragweed pollen.

I have put together some more comprehensive resources at http://www.allergyresources.co.uk/Cucumber.php

The allergy resources page for cucumber covers the key allergens, which allergic syndromes are linked to this allergy and other foods which are commonly cross reactive with cucumber.

There is also regularly updated links to useful websites specifically for cucumber allergies and the latest research papers on the topic.

If you have multiple allergies and are interested in how they are linked or want to find out more about food allergies outside the usual top 14 then you can follow me on Facebook or Twitter, where I share a food allergy card every day of the week.

Courgette Allergy Resources

Courgette, or zucchini as it is known in the USA very rarely causes food allergies.

None of the allergens in courgette have been recognised by the World Health Organisation, but it thought that the allergen responsible for causing allergic reactions are plant profilins.

I have put together some more comprehensive resources at http://www.allergyresources.co.uk/Courgette.php

The allergy resources page for courgette covers the key allergens, which allergic syndromes are linked to this allergy and other foods which are commonly cross reactive with courgette.

There is also regularly updated links to useful websites specifically for courgette allergies and the latest research papers on the topic.

If you have multiple allergies and are interested in how they are linked or want to find out more about food allergies outside the usual top 14 then you can follow me on Facebook or Twitter, where I share a food allergy card every day of the week.

Coriander Allergy Resources

Coriander is a herb, commonly called Cilantro in the USA. As a very rare allergy it is not well studied and there has been no confirmation of which allergens are causing the reactions.

Allergic reactions are most likely to be caused by Bet v 1-like proteins, which cause reactions in people sensitised to birch tree pollen and give oral allergy type symptoms.

Another suggestion is that plants in the Apiaceae family contain profilin proteins which can cause allergic reactions in uncommon circumstances.

I have put together some more comprehensive resources at http://www.allergyresources.co.uk/Coriander.php

The allergy resources page for coriander covers the key allergens, which allergic syndromes are linked to this allergy and other foods which are commonly cross reactive with coriander.

There is also regularly updated links to useful websites specifically for coriander allergies and the latest research papers on the topic.

If you have multiple allergies and are interested in how they are linked or want to find out more about food allergies outside the usual top 14 then you can follow me on Facebook or Twitter, where I share a food allergy card every day of the week.

Cocoa Allergy Resources

Most of the studies relating to cocoa allergy are from factory workers and chocolatiers who spend all of their time working with the product.

There is a 2S seed storage protein in cocoa which is similar to those proteins found in tree nuts. Chocolate contains theobromine and caffeine which may cause people to believe they are allergic to cocoa.

I have put together some more comprehensive resources at http://www.allergyresources.co.uk/Cocoa.php

The allergy resources page for cocoa covers the key allergens, which allergic syndromes are linked to this allergy and other foods which are commonly cross reactive with cocoa .

There is also regularly updated links to useful websites specifically for cocoa allergies and the latest research papers on the topic.

If you have multiple allergies and are interested in how they are linked or want to find out more about food allergies outside the usual top 14 then you can follow me on Facebook or Twitter, where I share a food allergy card every day of the week.

March Allergy Articles

All the latest allergy, asthma and eczema news!

I spent the last month searching the internet for the most interesting allergy, asthma and eczema news and articles, so you don’t have to! Take a look at what I found.

Follow me on  Facebook  or Twitter if you don’t want to miss my monthly round-ups.


Post-transplant food anaphylaxis in an adult cord blood transplant recipient (Ms. No. IJHM-D-20-01037R1)

The most common clinical manifestations of food allergy. The literature review – abstract in English

The Practical Dietary Management of Food Protein-Induced Enterocolitis Syndrome

Factors associated with the development of oral allergy syndrome: A retrospective questionnaire survey of Japanese university students

Quality of Life is Lower in Adults Labeled with Childhood-Onset Compared to Adult-Onset Food Allergy

Infant Feeding Practices During the First Postnatal Year and Risk of Asthma and Allergic Disease During the First 6 Years of Life

Early intervention of atopic dermatitis as a preventive strategy for progression of food allergy

Fruit-Induced Anaphylaxis: Clinical Presentation and Management

EAACI guideline: Preventing the development of food allergy in infants and young children (2020 update)

Assessing Daily Food Allergy Self-Management among Adolescents Using a 24-Hour Recall Interview

Pollen-related food allergy in children with seasonal allergic rhinitis

Vitamin D and iron status in children with food allergy

Time trends of childhood food allergy in China: Three cross‐sectional surveys in 1999, 2009, and 2019

Nomenclature and clinical phenotypes of atopic dermatitis

Real‐life impact of COVID‐19 pandemic lockdown on the management of pediatric and adult asthma: a survey by the EAACI Asthma Section


Let me know if you found any of these interesting or useful.

If you spot an article or research that you think would interest me you can message my Facebook page or tag me in a Tweet.

Jemma


Couldn’t find anything that interested you? Try the previous months Articles of Interest

Camomile Allergy Resources

Camomile is a less common food allergy – none of the allergens it contains have been recognised by the World Health Organisation.

Contact reactions linked to camomile have been linked to nobilin (Sweet chamomile) and desacetylmatricarin (German chamomile). Both are sesquiterpene lactones and are commonly used in cosmetics.

I have put together some more comprehensive resources at http://www.allergyresources.co.uk/Camomile.php

The allergy resources page for camomile covers the key allergens, which allergic syndromes are linked to this allergy and other foods which are commonly cross reactive with camomile.

There is also regularly updated links to useful websites specifically for camomile allergies and the latest research papers on the topic.

If you have multiple allergies and are interested in how they are linked or want to find out more about food allergies outside the usual top 14 then you can follow me on Facebook or Twitter, where I share a food allergy card every day of the week.

Cow’s Milk Allergy Resources

There are 12 allergens associated with cows, 9 of them relate to an allergy to the milk they produce (rather than the consumption of meat they produce).

The allergenic proteins in cow’s milk are generally split into albumins (commonly called whey) and casein. In human milk the split is usually 60% whey to 40% casein. In cow’s milk the split is 20% whey to 80% casein. This massive difference in composition is thought to be the cause of what causes IgE allergic reaction to cow’s milk, with most people being allergic to casein proteins in the milk.

I have put together some more comprehensive resources at http://www.allergyresources.co.uk/Cow-Milk.php

The allergy resources page for cow’s milk covers the key allergens, which allergic syndromes are linked to this allergy and other foods which are commonly cross reactive with cow’s milk .

There is also regularly updated links to useful websites specifically for cow’s milk allergies and the latest research papers on the topic.

If you have multiple allergies and are interested in how they are linked or want to find out more about food allergies outside the usual top 14 then you can follow me on Facebook or Twitter, where I share a food allergy card every day of the week.

Beef Allergy Resources

There are 12 allergens associated with cows, 4 of them relate to an allergy to consumption of meat (rather than to the milk they produce).

Serum albumin proteins are responsible for allergic reactions to mammalian meat in general, if allergic to many types of red meat then you may have Alpa-gal Syndrome.

If sensitised to Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) only, then you may have issues with eating beef and drinking cow’s milk.

I have put together some more comprehensive resources at http://www.allergyresources.co.uk/Beef.php

The allergy resources page for beef covers the key allergens, which allergic syndromes are linked to this allergy and other foods which are commonly cross reactive with beef.

There is also regularly updated links to useful websites specifically for beef allergies and the latest research papers on the topic.

If you have multiple allergies and are interested in how they are linked or want to find out more about food allergies outside the usual top 14 then you can follow me on Facebook or Twitter, where I share a food allergy card every day of the week.