Celery Allergy Resources

In the UK celery is listed as a top 14 allergen which needs to be labelled in packaged food.

There are 6 allergens associated with celery allergy – the main allergen in celery is Api g 1 which is similar in shape to the Bet v 1 allergens which can cause oral allergy type symptoms.

Two of the proteins found in celery are lipid transfer proteins, Api g 2 and 6.

I have put together some more comprehensive resources at http://www.allergyresources.co.uk/Celery.php

The allergy resources page for celery covers the key allergens, which allergic syndromes are linked to this allergy and other foods which are commonly cross reactive with celery.

There is also regularly updated links to useful websites specifically for celery allergies and the latest research papers on the topic.

If you have multiple allergies and are interested in how they are linked or want to find out more about food allergies outside the usual top 14 then you can follow me on Facebook or Twitter, where I share a food allergy card every day of the week.

Cabbage Allergy Resources

The allergen associated with a cabbage allergy is Bra o 3.

Bra o 3 is a Lipid Transfer Protein (LTP), these proteins are resistant to heat and are found in many types of plants. Patients suffering from a more severe allergy to cooked fruit may be sensitised to this group of proteins.

I have put together some more comprehensive resources at http://www.allergyresources.co.uk/Cabbage.php

The allergy resources page for cabbage covers the key allergens, which allergic syndromes are linked to this allergy and other foods which are commonly cross reactive with cabbage.

There is also regularly updated links to useful websites specifically for cabbage allergies and the latest research papers on the topic.

If you have multiple allergies and are interested in how they are linked or want to find out more about food allergies outside the usual top 14 then you can follow me on Facebook or Twitter, where I share a food allergy card every day of the week.

Avocado Allergy Resources

The main allergen found in avocado is called Pers a 1 this is a chitinase, which is a plant derived enzyme made by plants naturally to act as a defence against fungal attacks.

Avocado allergy has been linked to Latex Food Syndrome, which is caused by the body confusing the proteins it encounters in food to that of latex proteins to which it is already sensitised.

Avocado allergy has also been linked in recent years to FPIES – Food Protein Induced Enterocolitis Syndrome.

I have put together some more comprehensive resources at http://www.allergyresources.co.uk/Avocado.php

The allergy resources page for avocado covers the key allergens, which allergic syndromes are linked to this allergy and other foods which are commonly cross reactive with avocado.

There is also regularly updated links to useful websites specifically for avocado allergies and the latest research papers on the topic.

If you have multiple allergies and are interested in how they are linked or want to find out more about food allergies outside the usual top 14 then you can follow me on Facebook or Twitter, where I share a food allergy card every day of the week.

Flaxseed Allergy Resources

Flaxseed is also often known as linseed. It is a plant harvested for it’s seeds, they can be used to make vegetable oil or a groundmeal which can be used in baking and as a health supplement.

Lin u 2 is the name of the allegen in flaxseed. This is a 2S seed storage albumin. These types of proteins are found in many seeds and nuts.

I have put together some more comprehensive resources at http://www.allergyresources.co.uk/Flaxseed.php

The allergy resources page for flaxseed covers the key allergens, which allergic syndromes are linked to this allergy and other foods which are commonly cross reactive with flaxseed.

There is also regularly updated links to useful websites specifically for flaxseed allergies and the latest research papers on the topic.

If you have multiple allergies and are interested in how they are linked or want to find out more about food allergies outside the usual top 14 then you can follow me on Facebook or Twitter, where I share a food allergy card every day of the week.

Peach Allergy Resources

The allergens associated with a peach allergy are called Pru p 1, Pru p 2, Pru p 3, Pru p 4, Pru p 7 and Pru p 9.

Most people suffering oral allergy type symptoms to peach are thought to be sensitised to the protein Pru p 1, which is similar in shape to Bet v 1 which is a protein found in birch pollen. This can cause cross reactions with other fruit.

I have put together some more comprehensive resources at http://www.allergyresources.co.uk/Peach.php

The allergy resources page for peach covers the key allergens, which allergic syndromes are linked to this allergy and other foods which are commonly cross reactive with peach.

There is also regularly updated links to useful websites specifically for peach allergies and the latest research papers on the topic.

If you have multiple allergies and are interested in how they are linked or want to find out more about food allergies outside the usual top 14 then you can follow me on Facebook or Twitter, where I share a food allergy card every day of the week.

Pear Allergy Resources

The allergens associated with a pear allergy are called Pyr c 1, Pyr c 3, Pyr c 4 and Pyr c 5.

Most people suffering from this allergy are thought to be sensitised to the protein Pyr c 1, which is similar in shape to Bet v 1 which is a protein found in birch pollen. This can cause cross reactions with other fruit.

I have put together some more comprehensive resources at http://www.allergyresources.co.uk/Pear.php

The allergy resources page for pear covers the key allergens, which allergic syndromes are linked to this allergy and other foods which are commonly cross reactive with pear.

There is also regularly updated links to useful websites specifically for pear allergies and the latest research papers on the topic.

If you have multiple allergies and are interested in how they are linked or want to find out more about food allergies outside the usual top 14 then you can follow me on Facebook or Twitter, where I share a food allergy card every day of the week.

Cherry Allergy Resources

The allergens associated with a cherry allergy are called Pru av 1, Pru av 2, Pru av 3 and Pru av 7.

Most people suffering from this allergy are thought to be sensitised to the protein Pru av 1, which is similar in shape to Bet v 1 which is a protein found in birch pollen. This can cause cross reactions with other fruit.

I have put together some more comprehensive resources at http://www.allergyresources.co.uk/Cherry.php

The allergy resources page for cherry covers the key allergens, which allergic syndromes are linked to this allergy and other foods which are commonly cross reactive with cherry.

There is also regularly updated links to useful websites specifically for cherry allergies and the latest research papers on the topic.

If you have multiple allergies and are interested in how they are linked or want to find out more about food allergies outside the usual top 14 then you can follow me on Facebook or Twitter, where I share a food allergy card every day of the week.

Garlic Allergy Resources

Garlic is a well recognised cause of allergic contact dermatitis and urticaria. Patch testing using neat garlic can cause false-positive reactions because of diallyl disulfide found in the bulb acting as an irritant on the skin.

Diallyl disulfide is used as a garlic flavouring in food and garlic oil.

I have put together some more comprehensive resources at http://www.allergyresources.co.uk/Garlic.php

The allergy resources page for garlic covers the key allergens, which allergic syndromes are linked to this allergy and other foods which are commonly cross reactive with garlic.

There is also regularly updated links to useful websites specifically for garlic allergies and the latest research papers on the topic.

If you have multiple allergies and are interested in how they are linked or want to find out more about food allergies outside the usual top 14 then you can follow me on Facebook or Twitter, where I share a food allergy card every day of the week.

Egg Allergy Resources

Eggs contain a lot of allergenic proteins. They are named gal d 1, gal d 2 d etc. up to gal d 10.

Gal d 1 to 4 are allergens found in the egg white. Gal d 5 is an allergenic protein in the yolk.

Gald d 8, 9 and 10 are allergens linked to fish/chicken allergens (gal d 8 is also known as alpha-parvalbumin).

I have put together some more comprehensive resources at http://www.allergyresources.co.uk/Egg.php

The allergy resources page for egg covers the key allergens, which allergic syndromes are linked to this allergy and other foods which are commonly cross reactive with egg.

There is also regularly updated links to useful websites specifically for egg allergies and the latest research papers on the topic.

If you have multiple allergies and are interested in how they are linked or want to find out more about food allergies outside the usual top 14 then you can follow me on Facebook or Twitter, where I share a food allergy card every day of the week.

Dill Allergy Resources

Most people react to the main allergen in dill, which is homologous to Bet v 1 found in Birch pollen which can cause oral allergy type symptoms to multiple fruits and vegetables.

Dill contains the protein hevein, which is homologous to chitinase which is the main cause of allergic reactions to Latex.

I have put together some more comprehensive resources at http://www.allergyresources.co.uk/Dill.php

The allergy resources page for dill covers the key allergens, which allergic syndromes are linked to this allergy and other foods which are commonly cross reactive with dill.

There is also regularly updated links to useful websites specifically for dill allergies and the latest research papers on the topic.

If you have multiple allergies and are interested in how they are linked or want to find out more about food allergies outside the usual top 14 then you can follow me on Facebook or Twitter, where I share a food allergy card every day of the week.