Soya Bean Allergy Resources

There are 7 allergens associated with soya bean allergy. These proteins include a profilin, 2S seed storage proteins, a Bet v 1 protein, 7S and a 11S seed storage proteins

I have put together some more comprehensive resources at http://www.allergyresources.co.uk/Soya.php

The allergy resources page for soya covers the key allergens, which allergic syndromes are linked to this allergy and other foods which are commonly cross reactive with soya.

There is also regularly updated links to useful websites specifically for soya allergies and the latest research papers on the topic.

If you have multiple allergies and are interested in how they are linked or want to find out more about food allergies outside the usual top 14 then you can follow me on Facebook or Twitter, where I share a food allergy card every day of the week.

Sesame Allergy Resources

There are seven allergens associated with sesame allergy.

2 are 2S seed storage proteins, 1 is a 7S seed storage protein and 2 are 11S seed storage proteins. These proteins are generally linked to tree nut, peanut and seed allergies. The last two allergens are oleosin proteins, which are found in parts of plants with a high oil content.

I have put together some more comprehensive resources at http://www.allergyresources.co.uk/Sesame.php

The allergy resources page for sesame covers the key allergens, which allergic syndromes are linked to this allergy and other foods which are commonly cross reactive with sesame.

There is also regularly updated links to useful websites specifically for sesame allergies and the latest research papers on the topic.

If you have multiple allergies and are interested in how they are linked or want to find out more about food allergies outside the usual top 14 then you can follow me on Facebook or Twitter, where I share a food allergy card every day of the week.

Pea Allergy Resources

There are 3 key allergens associated with pea allergy, Pis s 1, Pis s 2 and Pis s 3. These are a vicilin protein, a convicilin protein and a lipid transfer protein (LTP).

I have put together some more comprehensive resources at http://www.allergyresources.co.uk/Pea.php

The allergy resources page for pea covers the key allergens, which allergic syndromes are linked to this allergy and other foods which are commonly cross reactive with peas .

There is also regularly updated links to useful websites specifically for pea allergies and the latest research papers on the topic.

If you have multiple allergies and are interested in how they are linked or want to find out more about food allergies outside the usual top 14 then you can follow me on Facebook or Twitter, where I share a food allergy card every day of the week.

Mung Bean Allergy Resources

Mung beans (also known as green gram) are most commonly eaten in Asia, but they are becoming more popular worldwide.

Mung beans contain multiple allergenic proteins including a Bet v 1 protein, which can cause cross reactivity and a vicilin protein called Vig r 2. Vicilin proteins are commonly found in nuts and seeds.

Mung bean allergy has been associated with Pollen Food Allergy Syndrome due to the Bet v 1 like protein. 

I have put together some more comprehensive resources at http://www.allergyresources.co.uk/Mung.php

The allergy resources page for mung beans covers the key allergens, which allergic syndromes are linked to this allergy and other foods which are commonly cross reactive with mung beans .

There is also regularly updated links to useful websites specifically for mung bean allergies and the latest research papers on the topic.

If you have multiple allergies and are interested in how they are linked or want to find out more about food allergies outside the usual top 14 then you can follow me on Facebook or Twitter, where I share a food allergy card every day of the week.

Lupin Allergy Resources

Lupin has been declared a Top 14 allergen in Europe, so must be labelled on any food products bought and consumed. There are two types of lupins identified by the World Health Organisation (WHO) as having identified allergens.

White lupin is commonly grown in Mediterranean countries and is a legume which can be ground into a flour and used in baked products. The key allergen in white lupin is Lup a 5 which is a plant profilin protein.

The other lupin identified by WHO is narrow leaved lupin, more widely distributed across Europe, Asia, North America, Africa and Australia. This plant is different in that it contains Lup an 1, a 7S seed storage protein and Lup an 3, which is a lipid transfer protein (LTP).

I have put together some more comprehensive resources at http://www.allergyresources.co.uk/Lupin.php

The allergy resources page for lupin covers the key allergens, which allergic syndromes are linked to this allergy and other foods which are commonly cross reactive with lupin.

There is also regularly updated links to useful websites specifically for lupin allergies and the latest research papers on the topic.

If you have multiple allergies and are interested in how they are linked or want to find out more about food allergies outside the usual top 14 then you can follow me on Facebook or Twitter, where I share a food allergy card every day of the week.

Lentil Allergy Resources

There are 3 key allergens associated with lentil allergies.

Len c 1 is a gamma vicilin unit protein. This links the protein in lentils to other legumes, nuts and seeds that contain vicilin like proteins. Len c 3 is a lipid transfer protein (LTP).

I have put together some more comprehensive resources at http://www.allergyresources.co.uk/Lentil.php

The allergy resources page for lentils covers the key allergens, which allergic syndromes are linked to this allergy and other foods which are commonly cross reactive with lentils .

There is also regularly updated links to useful websites specifically for lentil allergies and the latest research papers on the topic.

If you have multiple allergies and are interested in how they are linked or want to find out more about food allergies outside the usual top 14 then you can follow me on Facebook or Twitter, where I share a food allergy card every day of the week.

Peanut Allergy Resources

There are 18 allergens recognised by the World Health Organisation (WHO) associated with peanut allergy.

These allergens include 2S, 7S and 11S seed storage proteins which are also found in many tree nuts.

Peanuts also contain plant profilin proteins, lipid transfer proteins and Bet v 1 proteins which are associated with Pollen Food Syndrome.

I have put together some more comprehensive resources at http://www.allergyresources.co.uk/Peanut.php

The allergy resources page for peanut covers the key allergens, which allergic syndromes are linked to this allergy and other foods which are commonly cross reactive with peanut .

There is also regularly updated links to useful websites specifically for peanut allergies and the latest research papers on the topic.

If you have multiple allergies and are interested in how they are linked or want to find out more about food allergies outside the usual top 14 then you can follow me on Facebook or Twitter, where I share a food allergy card every day of the week.

Buckwheat Allergy Resources

Buckwheat is not actually related to wheat as it is not a grass, but it produces grain like seeds which can be used to replace cereals.

Buckwheat does not contain any gluten, so is becoming a more popular ingredient and can be eaten by coeliacs.

Buckwheat contains 4 key allergens. Two of them are vicilin like. Fag e 2 is a 2S seed storage allergen. These allergens make buckwheat more like seeds than cereals.

I have put together some more comprehensive resources at http://www.allergyresources.co.uk/Buckwheat.php

The allergy resources page for buckwheat covers the key allergens, which allergic syndromes are linked to this allergy and other foods which are commonly cross reactive with buckwheat.

There is also regularly updated links to useful websites specifically for buckwheat allergies and the latest research papers on the topic.

If you have multiple allergies and are interested in how they are linked or want to find out more about food allergies outside the usual top 14 then you can follow me on Facebook or Twitter, where I share a food allergy card every day of the week.

Pumpkin Allergy Resources

There are 2 allergenic proteins found in pumpkins, Cuc ma 4 and Cuc ma 5. The first is an 11S seed storage protein and the second is a 2S seed storage protein. These are the types of proteins that are usually found in nuts and seeds.

I have put together some more comprehensive resources at http://www.allergyresources.co.uk/Pumpkin.php

The allergy resources page for pumpkin covers the key allergens, which allergic syndromes are linked to this allergy and other foods which are commonly cross reactive with pumpkin.

There is also regularly updated links to useful websites specifically for pumpkin allergies and the latest research papers on the topic.

If you have multiple allergies and are interested in how they are linked or want to find out more about food allergies outside the usual top 14 then you can follow me on Facebook or Twitter, where I share a food allergy card every day of the week.

Wheat Allergy Resources

Wheat contains a whopping 18 allergens which have been identified as causing IgE allergic reactions.

An allergy to wheat has been linked to Wheat Dependent Exercise Induced Anaphylaxis (WD-EIA) and Baker’s Asthma.

Wheat contains lipid transfer proteins, so you may suffer cross reactivity from consuming other cereals containing LTPs, like durum wheat and maize.

I have put together some more comprehensive resources at http://www.allergyresources.co.uk/Wheat.php

The allergy resources page for wheat covers the key allergens, which allergic syndromes are linked to this allergy and other foods which are commonly cross reactive with wheat.

There is also regularly updated links to useful websites specifically for wheat allergies and the latest research papers on the topic.

If you have multiple allergies and are interested in how they are linked or want to find out more about food allergies outside the usual top 14 then you can follow me on Facebook or Twitter, where I share a food allergy card every day of the week.