Food Allergy: Polcalcin Proteins

What are they?

Polcalcin are calcium binding proteins found in a relatively large group of plants. These proteins are involved in signaling processes (chemical signals between plants cells) and pollen tube growth.

They are found in tree, grass and weed pollens. They are very cross-reactive.

Polcalcin proteins have low sensitisation rates compared to other allergenic proteins and are therefore considered to be minor pollen panallergens. Other pollen panallergens are Bet v 1 allergens, profilin proteins and lipid transfer proteins.

If you want to read more on the topic and access all the additional resources check out my website at – www.allergyresources.co.uk/Polcalcin.php

The majority of my posts are no longer on WordPress – follow me on  Facebook  or Twitter if you don’t want to miss my monthly round-ups or allergy card updates!

Jemma


Food Allergy: Profilin Proteins

What are they?

Many plant and animal tissues contain profilin proteins. They are small proteins involved in the assembly of actin filaments. Actin filaments in plants determine the shape and movement of the cell’s surface.

Profilin proteins are considered to be minor panallergens. They are less commonly associated with allergy than lipid transfer proteins and seed storage proteins, but have become more studied in recent years due to the possibility of cross reactivity.

These proteins vary from species to species in how the allergenicity is changed due to heat, but most studies show many are heat resistant and will still elicit an allergic reaction after cooking or processing.

If you want to read more on the topic and access all the additional resources check out my website at – www.allergyresources.co.uk/Profilin.php

The majority of my posts are no longer on WordPress – follow me on  Facebook  or Twitter if you don’t want to miss my monthly round-ups or allergy card updates!

Jemma


Grass Pollen – Allergy Resources

There are multiple species of grasses described on the World Health Organization Allergen Database.

The main allergen involved in grass allergy is the beta expansin protein. These are cell wall proteins which affect the airways.

Grass pollen occurs in the UK between April and September, peaking in June. This varies in different countries. It is considered to have high allergenicity.

I have put together some more comprehensive resources at http://www.allergyresources.co.uk/Grass.php

The allergy resources page for grass pollen covers the key allergens, which allergic syndromes are linked to this allergy and other foods which are commonly cross reactive with grass pollen.

There is also regularly updated links to useful websites specifically for grass pollen allergies and the latest research papers on the topic.

If you have multiple allergies and are interested in how they are linked or want to find out more about food allergies outside the usual top 14 then you can follow me on Facebook or Twitter, where I share a food allergy card every day of the week.

Rabbit – Allergy Resources

There are 3 allergens associated with an allergy to rabbits, this includes their hair, dander (which is flakes of dry skin), urine and saliva.

All three allergens are lipocalin proteins, in other animal dander allergies this is the protein that most individuals react to. These proteins transport molecules like lipids and steroids around the body.

I have put together some more comprehensive resources at http://www.allergyresources.co.uk/Rabbit.php

The allergy resources page for rabbit covers the key allergens, which allergic syndromes are linked to this allergy and other foods which are commonly cross reactive with rabbit hair.

There is also regularly updated links to useful websites specifically for rabbit hair allergies and the latest research papers on the topic.

If you have multiple allergies and are interested in how they are linked or want to find out more about food allergies outside the usual top 14 then you can follow me on Facebook or Twitter, where I share a food allergy card every day of the week.

Latex – Allergy Resources

Latex is a product of the rubber tree, Hevea brasiliensis , it has 15 associated contact allergens.

Hev b 6 is a hevein precursor protein, this allergen is important in cross reactivity.

Hev b 7 is a patatin protein, again important in cross reactivity.

Hev b 8 is a profilin profilin, these are panallergens found in many plants and foods.

Hev b 11 is a chitinase, these are proteins found in other foods and contribute to cross reactivity of latex.

Hev b 12 is a lipid transfer protein (LTP) this is another panallergen and cause problems over multiple foods and plants.

An allergy to latex may give you the potential to be allergic to many foods and pollens, but you may only have contact issues with latex itself.

Latex is often associated with Latex Food Syndrome. This is where the body is initially sensitised to the latex plant and later becomes allergic to foods which contain similarly shaped proteins.

Latex contains LTPs, this can link it to LTP Syndrome, where LTPs in multiple plants and foods cause allergic reactions.

I have put together some more comprehensive resources at http://www.allergyresources.co.uk/Latex.php

The allergy resources page for latex covers the key allergens, which allergic syndromes are linked to this allergy and other foods which are commonly cross reactive with latex.

There is also regularly updated links to useful websites specifically for latex allergies and the latest research papers on the topic.

If you have multiple allergies and are interested in how they are linked or want to find out more about food allergies outside the usual top 14 then you can follow me on Facebook or Twitter, where I share a food allergy card every day of the week.

Ash Pollen – Allergy Resources

There is only 1 pollen allergen associated with ash pollen, and it is associated with airways.

Fra e 1 is an Ole e 1-like protein, which is a protein found in olive tree pollen. This protein has high cross-reactivity with the main allergens of other plants in the Oleaceae family. Ole e 1 is the marker allergen for diagnosing these linked allergens and they are often called “Ole e 1-like”. Most patients with ash pollen allergy are linked to this allergen.

Ash pollen season is between March and June. This varies from country to country. It is considered to have medium to high allergenicity, but is often overlooked as it’s pollen season coincides with birch trees, which are the most common cause of pollen allergies.

I have put together some more comprehensive resources at http://www.allergyresources.co.uk/Ash.php

The allergy resources page for ash pollen covers the key allergens, which allergic syndromes are linked to this allergy and other foods which are commonly cross reactive with ash pollen.

There is also regularly updated links to useful websites specifically for ash pollen allergies and the latest research papers on the topic.

If you have multiple allergies and are interested in how they are linked or want to find out more about food allergies outside the usual top 14 then you can follow me on Facebook or Twitter, where I share a food allergy card every day of the week.

Mouse – Allergy Resources

There is only 1 allergen associated with an allergy to mice, this includes their hair, dander (which is flakes of dry skin), urine and saliva.

Mus m 1 are lipocalin proteins, in other animal dander allergies this is the protein that most individuals react to. These proteins transport molecules like lipids and steroids around the body.

I have put together some more comprehensive resources at http://www.allergyresources.co.uk/Mouse.php

The allergy resources page for mouse covers the key allergens, which allergic syndromes are linked to this allergy and other foods which are commonly cross reactive with mouse hair.

There is also regularly updated links to useful websites specifically for mouse hair allergies and the latest research papers on the topic.

If you have multiple allergies and are interested in how they are linked or want to find out more about food allergies outside the usual top 14 then you can follow me on Facebook or Twitter, where I share a food allergy card every day of the week.

Gold – Allergy Resources

Gold is a metal which is commonly used as a metal in jewellery and piercings.

Gold allergy has also been noted after procedures to have dental gold used in fillings.

24 carat gold jewellery has less than 0.1% other metals in the alloy. The amount of other metals increases with decreasing carat level, 18 carat gold has 25% other metals, 12 carat gold has 50% other metals and 9 carat gold is made up of more than 60% other metals. An allergy to a lower carat gold may be to another metal present.

I have put together some more comprehensive resources at http://www.allergyresources.co.uk/Gold.php

The allergy resources page for gold covers the key allergens, which allergic syndromes are linked to this allergy and other foods which are commonly cross reactive with gold .

There is also regularly updated links to useful websites specifically for gold allergies and the latest research papers on the topic.

If you have multiple allergies and are interested in how they are linked or want to find out more about food allergies outside the usual top 14 then you can follow me on Facebook or Twitter, where I share a food allergy card every day of the week.

Olive Pollen – Allergy Resources

There are 15 pollen allergens associated with olive pollen, they are all allergens associated with airways.

Ole e 1 is a glycoprotein, it has high cross-reactivity with the main allergens of other plants in the Oleaceae family. Ole e 1 is the marker allergen for diagnosing these linked allergens and they are often called “Ole e 1-like”. Most patients with olive pollen allergy are linked to this allergen. Ole e 2 is a profilin protein, these are panallergens and can cause allergies across multiple species of plants and foods.

Ole e 7 is a lipid transfer protein, which can cause serious allergic reactions across multiple plants.

Ole e 3 and 8 are polcalcin proteins, these are calcium binding protein commonly associated with pollen germination. These proteins are highly cross reactive and also considered to be panallergens.

Olive pollen is more common in warmer European climates. Pollen season is between April and June. This varies from country to country. It is considered to have medium to high allergenicity.

Sensitisation to olive pollen does not mean you should avoid eating olives or using olive oil, there is very little evidence that there is cross reactivity through food.

I have put together some more comprehensive resources at http://www.allergyresources.co.uk/Olive.php

The allergy resources page for olive pollen covers the key allergens, which allergic syndromes are linked to this allergy and other foods which are commonly cross reactive with olive pollen.

There is also regularly updated links to useful websites specifically for olive pollen allergies and the latest research papers on the topic.

If you have multiple allergies and are interested in how they are linked or want to find out more about food allergies outside the usual top 14 then you can follow me on Facebook or Twitter, where I share a food allergy card every day of the week.

Horse Hair – Allergy Resources

There are 6 allergens associated with an allergy to horses, this includes their hair, dander (which is flakes of dry skin), urine and saliva.

Equ c 1 and Equ c 2 are lipocalin proteins, in other animal dander allergies this is the protein that most individuals react to. These proteins transport molecules like lipids and steroids around the body.

Equ c 3 is a serum albumin protein, people who are allergic to this protein are more likely to be allergic to other mammals and very rarely can become allergic to eating mammalian meats such as beef, chicken and pork, which also contain these proteins.

Equ c 6 is a lysozyme which is a contact allergen and is also found in donkeys and chickens.

I have put together some more comprehensive resources at http://www.allergyresources.co.uk/Horse.php

The allergy resources page for horse covers the key allergens, which allergic syndromes are linked to this allergy and other foods which are commonly cross reactive with horse hair.

There is also regularly updated links to useful websites specifically for horse hair allergies and the latest research papers on the topic.

If you have multiple allergies and are interested in how they are linked or want to find out more about food allergies outside the usual top 14 then you can follow me on Facebook or Twitter, where I share a food allergy card every day of the week.