Food Allergy: 7S Seed Storage Proteins

What are they?

7S seed storage proteins are also known as vicilin and these terms are often used interchangeably.

They are globulin proteins involved in the hydration processes in plant cells and are important for breakdown during germination.

7S seed storage proteins belong to the cupin superfamily which include a wide range of enzymes as well as 7S and 11S seed storage proteins.

If you want to read more on the topic and access all the additional resources check out my website at – www.allergyresources.co.uk/7S-Proteins.php

The majority of my posts are no longer on WordPress – follow me on  Facebook  or Twitter if you don’t want to miss my monthly round-ups or allergy card updates!

Jemma


Chrome – Allergy Resources

Chrome allergy rarely occurs by touching the chrome finishings we often associate with the metal. Chrome allergy is linked to a reaction to chromium salts, which are used to manufacture other products such as cement, mortar, leather and paint. Most sufferers of this allergy are from occupational exposure.

Chrome allergy has also been noted after transplantation surgery, mostly associated with hip and knee replacements.

I have put together some more comprehensive resources at http://www.allergyresources.co.uk/Chrome.php

The allergy resources page for chrome covers the key allergens, which allergic syndromes are linked to this allergy and other foods which are commonly cross reactive with chrome.

There is also regularly updated links to useful websites specifically for chrome allergies and the latest research papers on the topic.

If you have multiple allergies and are interested in how they are linked or want to find out more about food allergies outside the usual top 14 then you can follow me on Facebook or Twitter, where I share a food allergy card every day of the week.

Hazel Pollen – Allergy Resources

There are 3 airway allergens associated with hazel tree pollen, Cor a 1, Cor a 6 and Cor a 10. There are 8 allergens associated with eating hazelnuts, you can find more information on the Hazelnut page.

Cor a 1 is a Bet v 1 allergen, which means people suffering from this particular allergen will also be allergic to the pollen from birch trees.

Cor a 6 is an isoflavone reductase protein and Cor a 10 is a luminal binding protein.

Hazel pollen occurs in the UK between January and April, peaking in February. This varies in different countries. It is considered to have medium to high allergenicity.

I have put together some more comprehensive resources at http://www.allergyresources.co.uk/Hazel.php

The allergy resources page for hazel pollen covers the key allergens, which allergic syndromes are linked to this allergy and other foods which are commonly cross reactive with hazel pollen.

There is also regularly updated links to useful websites specifically for hazel pollen allergies and the latest research papers on the topic.

If you have multiple allergies and are interested in how they are linked or want to find out more about food allergies outside the usual top 14 then you can follow me on Facebook or Twitter, where I share a food allergy card every day of the week.

Dust Mite Allergy Resources

There are 4 dust mite species in the World Health Organization Allergy database. Dermatophagoides farinae is also known as the American House Dust Mite which has 36 recognised airway allergens.

Dermatophagoides microceras has 1 allergen, a cysteine protease called Der m 1.

The European House Dust Mite, Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus has 30 recognised allergens and Euroglyphus maynei another species of house dust mite has just 5.

Cysteine Protease is a protein found in all species of dust mites and may be one of the proteins most patients are allergic to.

Other allergens associated with dust mites are cyclophilin proteins, tropomyosin and chitinase.

I have put together some more comprehensive resources at http://www.allergyresources.co.uk/Dust-Mite.php

The allergy resources page for dust mite allergy covers the key allergens, which allergic syndromes are linked to this allergy and other foods which are commonly cross reactive with dust mite allergy .

There is also regularly updated links to useful websites specifically for dust mite allergies and the latest research papers on the topic.

If you have multiple allergies and are interested in how they are linked or want to find out more about food allergies outside the usual top 14 then you can follow me on Facebook or Twitter, where I share a food allergy card every day of the week.

Food Allergy: 2S Seed Storage Proteins

What are they?

They are water soluble proteins found in a wide variety of nuts, seeds, fruit and vegetables. As allergenic proteins go, they are very stable, which means they are not easily damaged by extreme changes in temperature or pH due to their small size and compact structure. This means that the proteins ability to trigger and allergic reaction in a sensitised individual would not be hindered by cooking, freezing, digestion or in many cases food processing.

Their function in plants is as a source of nutrients during germination and growth of seedlings. They are also thought to also to play a role in defence against plant pathogens.

2S albumins are a part of the prolamin superfamily; other allergenic proteins included in this superfamily are lipid transfer proteins and prolamin storage proteins of cereals.

If you want to read more on the topic and access all the additional resources check out my website at – www.allergyresources.co.uk/2S-Proteins.php

The majority of my posts are no longer on WordPress – follow me on  Facebook  or Twitter if you don’t want to miss my monthly round-ups or allergy card updates!

Jemma


CARPA – Complement Activation-Related Pseudo-Allergy

What is CARPA?

The Complement System is the name of a group of proteins which circulate in the blood and tissue fluids. They are activated by the presence of molecular components they don’t recognise. This can be bacteria or viruses, but also damaged human cells and drug components they have never encountered before.

The proteins become sequentially activated in an enzyme cascade which can trigger an inflammatory immune response. This is what the term Activation-Related refers to.

Pseudo-Allergy means that the reaction is not a genuine IgE allergy but can present itself as one. A genuine allergy means that the body reacts in the same or similar way every time it is exposed to a specific allergen and can be detected by an IgE blood test. A pseudo-allergic reaction can be a single incident that would not be repeated on a subsequent exposure to the same allergen and would not show any sensitisation in an IgE blood test.

If you want to read more on the topic and access all the additional resources check out my website at – www.allergyresources.co.uk/CARPA.php

The majority of my posts are no longer on WordPress – follow me on  Facebook  or Twitter if you don’t want to miss my monthly round-ups or allergy card updates!

Jemma


Dog Allergy Resources

There are 8 allergens associated with dogs, they are all allergens which affect the airways.

Can f 1, 2, 4 and 6 are all lipocalin proteins. These proteins are the most likely candidate for your allergy to pet hair. These proteins transport molecules like lipids and steroids around the body.

Can f 3 is a serum albumin protein, people who are allergic to this protein are more likely to be allergic to other mammals and very rarely can become allergic to eating mammalian meats such as beef, chicken and pork, which also contain these proteins.

I have put together some more comprehensive resources at http://www.allergyresources.co.uk/Dog.php

The allergy resources page for dog allergy covers the key allergens, which allergic syndromes are linked to this allergy and other foods which are commonly cross reactive with dog allergy .

There is also regularly updated links to useful websites specifically for dog allergies and the latest research papers on the topic.

If you have multiple allergies and are interested in how they are linked or want to find out more about food allergies outside the usual top 14 then you can follow me on Facebook or Twitter, where I share a food allergy card every day of the week.

May Allergy Articles

All the latest allergy, asthma and eczema news!

The monthly allergy articles have now been moved to my main website in the blog section – www.allergyresources.co.uk

You can view this month’s article list here!

Follow me on  Facebook  or Twitter if you don’t want to miss my monthly round-ups.

Jemma


Coffee Allergy Resources

There are 3 allergens associated with coffee allergy. Cof a 1 is a chitinase protein. Chitinase proteins are usually associated with Latex Food Syndrome, but in this case the allergen is an inhalant allergen and not a food allergen, so does not need to be avoided if suffering from this syndrome.

Cof a 2 and Cof a 3 are both metallothionein proteins. Again these are inhalant allergens and not food allergens and they are used in the plant to bind metals such as zinc.

Coffee allergy has been linked to asthma, rhinoconjunctivitis and atopic dermatitis, especially in patients who work with coffee occupationally.

I have put together some more comprehensive resources at http://www.allergyresources.co.uk/Coffee.php

The allergy resources page for coffee allergy covers the key allergens, which allergic syndromes are linked to this allergy and other foods which are commonly cross reactive with coffee allergy.

There is also regularly updated links to useful websites specifically for coffee allergies and the latest research papers on the topic.

If you have multiple allergies and are interested in how they are linked or want to find out more about food allergies outside the usual top 14 then you can follow me on Facebook or Twitter, where I share a food allergy card every day of the week.

Chia Seed Allergy Resources

Chia seeds are from the Salvia hispanica plant. This plant is in the Lamiaceae family which contains lots of edible herbs such as mint and sage.

With the rise of veganism in Western countries the use of chia seeds has increased as they are an excellent replacement for eggs as they act as a thickening agent.

Chia seeds contain 7S and 11S seed storage proteins, which are protein found in lots of other nuts and seeds. There is however very limited information or clinical evidence on cross reactivity to show that these seeds should be avoided by nut and seed allergy sufferers.

There are only 2 case studies of chia seed causing severe allergic reaction, which may indicate the likelihood that cross reactivity between chia seeds and other seeds and nuts is actually very low.

I have put together some more comprehensive resources at http://www.allergyresources.co.uk/Chia.php

The allergy resources page for chia seed allergy covers the key allergens, which allergic syndromes are linked to this allergy and other foods which are commonly cross reactive with chia seed allergy.

There is also regularly updated links to useful websites specifically for cat allergies and the latest research papers on the topic.

If you have multiple allergies and are interested in how they are linked or want to find out more about food allergies outside the usual top 14 then you can follow me on Facebook or Twitter, where I share a food allergy card every day of the week.