Mulberry Allergy Resources

The main allergy associated with black mulberries is Mor n 3, this is a lipid transfer protein (LTP). LTPs are resistant to heat and are found in many types of plants. Patients suffering from a more severe allergy to cooked fruit may be sensitised to this group of proteins.

The white mulberry plant has an allergen, Mor a 2 which is associated with pollen allergies and asthma linked reactions.

I have put together some more comprehensive resources at http://www.allergyresources.co.uk/Mulberry.php

The allergy resources page for mulberry covers the key allergens, which allergic syndromes are linked to this allergy and other foods which are commonly cross reactive with mulberry.

There is also regularly updated links to useful websites specifically for mulberry allergies and the latest research papers on the topic.

If you have multiple allergies and are interested in how they are linked or want to find out more about food allergies outside the usual top 14 then you can follow me on Facebook or Twitter, where I share a food allergy card every day of the week.

Durum Wheat Allergy Resources

Durum wheat is different from common wheat and is most commonly used to make pasta products, semolina, bulgar wheat and cous cous.

There is only one key allergenic protein in durum wheat, Tri tu 14, which is a lipid transfer protein (LTP).

Durum wheat contains gluten and should be avoided if you suffer from coeliac disease.

I have put together some more comprehensive resources at http://www.allergyresources.co.uk/Durum.php

The allergy resources page for durum wheat covers the key allergens, which allergic syndromes are linked to this allergy and other foods which are commonly cross reactive with durum wheat.

There is also regularly updated links to useful websites specifically for durum wheat allergies and the latest research papers on the topic.

If you have multiple allergies and are interested in how they are linked or want to find out more about food allergies outside the usual top 14 then you can follow me on Facebook or Twitter, where I share a food allergy card every day of the week.

Rye Allergy Resources

There are 4 allergens associated with a allergy to rye. 3 are airway allergens and one is Sec c 20, a gamma secalin protein. The protein associated with Rye Allergy is linked to exercise induced anaphylaxis, more specifically wheat dependent exercise induced anaphylaxis.

I have put together some more comprehensive resources at http://www.allergyresources.co.uk/Rye.php

The allergy resources page for rye covers the key allergens, which allergic syndromes are linked to this allergy and other foods which are commonly cross reactive with rye.

There is also regularly updated links to useful websites specifically for rye allergies and the latest research papers on the topic.

If you have multiple allergies and are interested in how they are linked or want to find out more about food allergies outside the usual top 14 then you can follow me on Facebook or Twitter, where I share a food allergy card every day of the week.

Date Allergy Resources

The key allergen found in dates is a profilin called Pho d 2. Other plants containing profilin proteins are kiwi, pineapple, celery, peanut, chilli, watermelon, orange, hazelnut, muskmelon, carrot, strawberry, soya beans, barley, walnut, lychee, lupin, apple, banana, cherry, almond, peach, pear, mustard, tomato, aubergine and wheat.

I have put together some more comprehensive resources at http://www.allergyresources.co.uk/Date.php

The allergy resources page for date covers the key allergens, which allergic syndromes are linked to this allergy and other foods which are commonly cross reactive with date.

There is also regularly updated links to useful websites specifically for date allergies and the latest research papers on the topic.

If you have multiple allergies and are interested in how they are linked or want to find out more about food allergies outside the usual top 14 then you can follow me on Facebook or Twitter, where I share a food allergy card every day of the week.

Cassava Allergy Resources

Man e 5 is the main protein in cassava that causes allergic reactions. This is a Glutamic acid rich protein, similar in structure to hevein.

Cassava allergy can be linked to Latex Food Syndrome as the main allergen is similar in structure to hevein, which can cause problems in people with a latex allergy.

I have put together some more comprehensive resources at http://www.allergyresources.co.uk/Cassava.php

The allergy resources page for cassava covers the key allergens, which allergic syndromes are linked to this allergy and other foods which are commonly cross reactive with cassava.

There is also regularly updated links to useful websites specifically for cassava allergies and the latest research papers on the topic.

If you have multiple allergies and are interested in how they are linked or want to find out more about food allergies outside the usual top 14 then you can follow me on Facebook or Twitter, where I share a food allergy card every day of the week.

Lettuce Allergy Resources

Lettuce contains one allergenic protein called Lac s 1, it is a lipid transfer protein (LTP), these proteins are resistant to heat and are found in many types of plants. Patients suffering from a more severe allergy to cooked fruit may be sensitised to this group of proteins.

Lettuce also contains a contact allergen called lactucarium which can cause skin irritation. This is the white milky fluid found in the base of the stems when the plant is picked.

I have put together some more comprehensive resources at http://www.allergyresources.co.uk/Lettuce.php

The allergy resources page for lettuce covers the key allergens, which allergic syndromes are linked to this allergy and other foods which are commonly cross reactive with lettuce.

There is also regularly updated links to useful websites specifically for lettuce allergies and the latest research papers on the topic.

If you have multiple allergies and are interested in how they are linked or want to find out more about food allergies outside the usual top 14 then you can follow me on Facebook or Twitter, where I share a food allergy card every day of the week.

Chickpea Allergy Resources

Chickpeas are a legume, also known as garbanzo bean in the USA and in Asia as Chana or Bengal Gram.

There is one allergenic protein in chickpea allergy, that is Cic a 1, which is produced in the plant for growth.

There is some evidence of cross reactivity with other legumes, most commonly lentils, but cross reactivity has also been noted with lupin, peanuts and soya beans.

I have put together some more comprehensive resources at http://www.allergyresources.co.uk/Chickpea.php

The allergy resources page for chickpea covers the key allergens, which allergic syndromes are linked to this allergy and other foods which are commonly cross reactive with chickpea.

There is also regularly updated links to useful websites specifically for chickpea allergies and the latest research papers on the topic.

If you have multiple allergies and are interested in how they are linked or want to find out more about food allergies outside the usual top 14 then you can follow me on Facebook or Twitter, where I share a food allergy card every day of the week.

Chilli Allergy Resources

There are 2 allergens associated with an allergy to chillis. Cap a 1 is an osmotin (and thaumatin) like protein which is used in pathogen defense in the plant.

Cap a 2 is a profilin protein used in the plant for cell development.

I have put together some more comprehensive resources at http://www.allergyresources.co.uk/Chilli.php

The allergy resources page for chilli covers the key allergens, which allergic syndromes are linked to this allergy and other foods which are commonly cross reactive with chilli.

There is also regularly updated links to useful websites specifically for chilli allergies and the latest research papers on the topic.

If you have multiple allergies and are interested in how they are linked or want to find out more about food allergies outside the usual top 14 then you can follow me on Facebook or Twitter, where I share a food allergy card every day of the week.

Alpha-Gal Syndrome Resources

Alpha-gal Syndrome is a condition where a person has been bitten by a tick. The tick passes on a carbohydrate called galactose-alpha-1,3-galactose (also known as alpha-gal).

This carbohydrate causes an immune reaction to make IgE antibodies. This is an unusual allergic syndrome as it is caused by a carbohydrate and not an allergenic protein.

I have put together some more comprehensive resources at http://www.allergyresources.co.uk/Alphagal.php

The allergy resources page for Alpha-gal Syndrome covers the key allergens and other foods which are commonly associated with this allergic syndrome.

There is also regularly updated links to useful websites specifically for Alpha-gal Syndrome and the latest research papers on the topic.

If you have multiple allergies and are interested in how they are linked or want to find out more about food allergies outside the usual top 14 then you can follow me on Facebook or Twitter, where I share a food allergy card every day of the week.

February Allergy Articles

All the latest allergy, asthma and eczema news!

I spent the last month searching the internet for the most interesting allergy, asthma and eczema news and articles, so you don’t have to! Take a look at what I found.

Follow me on  Facebook  or Twitter if you don’t want to miss my monthly round-ups.


Use of biologics in allergen immunotherapy

Current developments in the treatment of peanut allergy

Provider recommendations and maternal practices when providing breast milk to children with IgE-mediated food allergy

Edible insects and food safety: allergy

An integrative medicine review of primary prevention of allergy in pediatrics

Oral birch pollen immunotherapy with apples: Results of a phase II clinical pilot study

COVID-19 infection in patients with mast cell disorders including mastocytosis does not impact mast cell activation symptoms

Is a History of Type 1 Allergic Diseases Associated with the Risk of Developing Multiple Sclerosis?

What does climate change mean for people with pollen allergy?

A case of anaphylactic reaction following oyster mushroom (Pleurotus ostreatus) inhalation

Clinical presentation and management of food protein‐induced enterocolitis syndrome in 113 Swedish children

Stay at home’: Is it good or not for house dust mite sensitized children with respiratory allergies?

Atopic skin diathesis rather than atopic dermatitis is associated with specific contact allergies

Pru p 3 sublingual immunotherapy in patients with Lipid Transfer Protein Syndrome: Is it worth it?

Nutritional Profile and Potential Health Benefits of Donkey Milk and Milk Products

Idiopathic Anaphylaxis: a Perplexing Diagnostic Challenge for Allergists

Contact dermatitis associated with preservatives: Retrospective analysis of North American Contact Dermatitis Group data, 1994 through 2016


Let me know if you found any of these interesting or useful.

If you spot an article or research that you think would interest me you can message my Facebook page or tag me in a Tweet.

Jemma


Couldn’t find anything that interested you? Try the previous months Articles of Interest