Horse Hair – Allergy Resources

There are 6 allergens associated with an allergy to horses, this includes their hair, dander (which is flakes of dry skin), urine and saliva.

Equ c 1 and Equ c 2 are lipocalin proteins, in other animal dander allergies this is the protein that most individuals react to. These proteins transport molecules like lipids and steroids around the body.

Equ c 3 is a serum albumin protein, people who are allergic to this protein are more likely to be allergic to other mammals and very rarely can become allergic to eating mammalian meats such as beef, chicken and pork, which also contain these proteins.

Equ c 6 is a lysozyme which is a contact allergen and is also found in donkeys and chickens.

I have put together some more comprehensive resources at http://www.allergyresources.co.uk/Horse.php

The allergy resources page for horse covers the key allergens, which allergic syndromes are linked to this allergy and other foods which are commonly cross reactive with horse hair.

There is also regularly updated links to useful websites specifically for horse hair allergies and the latest research papers on the topic.

If you have multiple allergies and are interested in how they are linked or want to find out more about food allergies outside the usual top 14 then you can follow me on Facebook or Twitter, where I share a food allergy card every day of the week.

Hamster Dander – Allergy Resources

There is only 1 allergen associated with an allergy to hamsters, this includes their hair, dander (which is flakes of dry skin), urine and saliva.

Mes a 1 are lipocalin proteins, in other animal dander allergies this is the protein that most individuals react to. These proteins transport molecules like lipids and steroids around the body.

I have put together some more comprehensive resources at http://www.allergyresources.co.uk/Hamster.php

The allergy resources page for hamster dander covers the key allergens, which allergic syndromes are linked to this allergy and other foods which are commonly cross reactive with hamster dander.

There is also regularly updated links to useful websites specifically for hamster dander allergies and the latest research papers on the topic.

If you have multiple allergies and are interested in how they are linked or want to find out more about food allergies outside the usual top 14 then you can follow me on Facebook or Twitter, where I share a food allergy card every day of the week.

How to Make a Food Allergy Diary

Making a Food Allergy Diary

The Gold Standard to determine which foods cause adverse reactions is by accurately recording the times of everything you eat and drink and any medications you take, noting the duration of all symptoms.

A simple diary with 4 weeks of food tracking should be enough for you to identify what food is causing your symptoms. The food diary can also be used to provide evidence of your allergic reactions to your health provider.

People often find that it is harder to gather evidence as to what is causing the problem when the reactions are less severe, but constant or when you think you are dealing with allergies to multiple foods.

The rest of this blog post has been moved to http://www.allergyresources.co.uk/Food-Allergy-Diary.php

This page has a free downloadable PDF and options to buy the official Allergy Resources Food Diary on Amazon.

Mugwort Pollen – Allergy Resources

Common mugwort has 6 associated 2 allergens associated with mugwort tree pollen, they are all allergens associated with airways.

Art v 2 is a PR-1 protein, where PR indicates it is involved in plant defence (PR = Pathogenesis Related).

Art v 3 is a lipid transfer protein, which can cause serious allergic reactions across multiple plants. Art v 4 is a profilin protein, these are panallergens and can cause allergies across multiple species of plants and foods.

Art v 5 is a polcalcin protein, which is a calcium binding protein commonly associated with pollen germination. These proteins are highly cross reactive.

Mugwort pollen occurs in the UK between June and September, peaking in July. This varies in different countries. It is considered to have low allergenicity unless in close proximity to a plant.

I have put together some more comprehensive resources at http://www.allergyresources.co.uk/Mugwort.php

The allergy resources page for mugwort pollen covers the key allergens, which allergic syndromes are linked to this allergy and other foods which are commonly cross reactive with mugwort pollen.

There is also regularly updated links to useful websites specifically for mugwort pollen allergies and the latest research papers on the topic.

If you have multiple allergies and are interested in how they are linked or want to find out more about food allergies outside the usual top 14 then you can follow me on Facebook or Twitter, where I share a food allergy card every day of the week.

Food Allergy: 11S Seed Storage Proteins

What are they?

11S seed storage proteins are also known as legumin and these terms are often used interchangeably. They are strongly associated with nut and seed allergies.

They are globulin proteins involved in storage of nutrients in the plant.

11S seed storage proteins belong to the cupin superfamily which include a wide range of enzymes as well as 7S and 11S seed storage proteins.

If you want to read more on the topic and access all the additional resources check out my website at – www.allergyresources.co.uk/11S-Proteins.php

The majority of my posts are no longer on WordPress – follow me on  Facebook  or Twitter if you don’t want to miss my monthly round-ups or allergy card updates!

Jemma


Cobalt – Allergy Resources

Cobalt is a metal which is commonly used as a binding metal in jewellery and household objects like cutlery.

Cobalt allergy has also been noted after transplantation surgery, mostly associated with hip and knee replacements and in dental procedures. Cobalt can also be found in cosmetics, hair dyes and inks.

It is a metallic element and important constituent of vitamin B12, so it may also often be found in B12 supplements.

I have put together some more comprehensive resources at http://www.allergyresources.co.uk/Cobalt.php

The allergy resources page for cobalt covers the key allergens, which allergic syndromes are linked to this allergy and other foods which are commonly cross reactive with cobalt .

There is also regularly updated links to useful websites specifically for cobalt allergies and the latest research papers on the topic.

If you have multiple allergies and are interested in how they are linked or want to find out more about food allergies outside the usual top 14 then you can follow me on Facebook or Twitter, where I share a food allergy card every day of the week.

Exercise Induced Anaphylaxis

What is it?

Exercise Induced Anaphylaxis (EIA) is a condition in which moderate to extreme exercise causes anaphylaxis in the patient (and in extreme cases even mild exercise cause symptoms). Many of these cases are further described as Food-Dependent Exercise Induced Anaphylaxis (FD-EIA), where a patient has eaten an allergen and then exercised, causing symptoms.

What are the symptoms of exercise induced anaphylaxis?

Symptoms of EIA may start at any stage of exercise or just after it, but in most patients, they begin within 30 minutes after initiating exercise. The condition has been described in some studies occurring up to 4 hours later.

If you want to read more on the topic and access all the additional resources check out my website at – www.allergyresources.co.uk/EIA.php

The majority of my posts are no longer on WordPress – follow me on  Facebook  or Twitter if you don’t want to miss my monthly round-ups or allergy card updates!

Jemma


Hemp – Allergy Resources

Hemp is a weed of the family Cannabinaceae that produces flowers, leaves and seeds. Hemp seeds are added to cereals, granola and pressed to produce oil.

There are 4 airway allergens associated with hemp allergy.

Can s 2 is a profilin protein, this is a panallergen causing allergies in multiple plants.

Can s 3 is a lipid transfer protein (LTP). This is another common panallergen which has been known to cause serious allergic reactions.

Can s 5 is a pathogenesis related protein, these proteins are also known as Bet v 1 proteins as they affect people already sensitised to birch tree pollen.

I have put together some more comprehensive resources at http://www.allergyresources.co.uk/Hemp.php

The allergy resources page for hemp covers the key allergens, which allergic syndromes are linked to this allergy and other foods which are commonly cross reactive with hemp.

There is also regularly updated links to useful websites specifically for hemp allergies and the latest research papers on the topic.

If you have multiple allergies and are interested in how they are linked or want to find out more about food allergies outside the usual top 14 then you can follow me on Facebook or Twitter, where I share a food allergy card every day of the week.

Food Allergy: 7S Seed Storage Proteins

What are they?

7S seed storage proteins are also known as vicilin and these terms are often used interchangeably.

They are globulin proteins involved in the hydration processes in plant cells and are important for breakdown during germination.

7S seed storage proteins belong to the cupin superfamily which include a wide range of enzymes as well as 7S and 11S seed storage proteins.

If you want to read more on the topic and access all the additional resources check out my website at – www.allergyresources.co.uk/7S-Proteins.php

The majority of my posts are no longer on WordPress – follow me on  Facebook  or Twitter if you don’t want to miss my monthly round-ups or allergy card updates!

Jemma


Chrome – Allergy Resources

Chrome allergy rarely occurs by touching the chrome finishings we often associate with the metal. Chrome allergy is linked to a reaction to chromium salts, which are used to manufacture other products such as cement, mortar, leather and paint. Most sufferers of this allergy are from occupational exposure.

Chrome allergy has also been noted after transplantation surgery, mostly associated with hip and knee replacements.

I have put together some more comprehensive resources at http://www.allergyresources.co.uk/Chrome.php

The allergy resources page for chrome covers the key allergens, which allergic syndromes are linked to this allergy and other foods which are commonly cross reactive with chrome.

There is also regularly updated links to useful websites specifically for chrome allergies and the latest research papers on the topic.

If you have multiple allergies and are interested in how they are linked or want to find out more about food allergies outside the usual top 14 then you can follow me on Facebook or Twitter, where I share a food allergy card every day of the week.