Parsley Allergy Resources

Allergic reactions to parsley are most likely to be caused by Bet v 1-like proteins, which cause reactions in people sensitised to birch tree pollen and give oral allergy type symptoms.

Lipid Transfer Proteins (LTP) have been identified in parsley, these proteins are resistant to heat and are found in many types of plants. Patients suffering from a more severe allergy to cooked fruit may be sensitised to this group of proteins.

I have put together some more comprehensive resources at http://www.allergyresources.co.uk/Parsley.php

The allergy resources page for parsley covers the key allergens, which allergic syndromes are linked to this allergy and other foods which are commonly cross reactive with parsley.

There is also regularly updated links to useful websites specifically for parsley allergies and the latest research papers on the topic.

If you have multiple allergies and are interested in how they are linked or want to find out more about food allergies outside the usual top 14 then you can follow me on Facebook or Twitter, where I share a food allergy card every day of the week.

Jackfruit Allergy Resources

Jackfruit is consumed more commonly in Europe as a vegan alternative to meat (commonly to replace spicy and barbecued meat.

The proteins in jackfruit are thought to be Bet v 1 like proteins, which means that your body mistakes them for birch pollen allergens and can cause oral allergy type symptoms to them on ingestion

I have put together some more comprehensive resources at http://www.allergyresources.co.uk/Jackfruit.php

The allergy resources page for jackfruit covers the key allergens, which allergic syndromes are linked to this allergy and other foods which are commonly cross reactive with jackfruit.

There is also regularly updated links to useful websites specifically for jackfruit allergies and the latest research papers on the topic.

If you have multiple allergies and are interested in how they are linked or want to find out more about food allergies outside the usual top 14 then you can follow me on Facebook or Twitter, where I share a food allergy card every day of the week.

Goat Milk Allergy Resources

Goat milk is commonly drunk in many countries and it’s by-products, such as goat cheese remain popular.

The allergenic proteins in goat milk are generally split into albumins (commonly called whey) and casein. In human milk the split is usually 60% whey to 40% casein. In goat milk the split is 20% whey to 80% casein. This is a similar composition to cow’s milk. This massive difference in composition is thought to be the cause of what causes IgE allergic reaction to mammalian milk, with most people being allergic to casein proteins in the milk.

I have put together some more comprehensive resources at http://www.allergyresources.co.uk/Goat.php

The allergy resources page for goat milk covers the key allergens, which allergic syndromes are linked to this allergy and other foods which are commonly cross reactive with goat milk.

There is also regularly updated links to useful websites specifically for goat milk allergies and the latest research papers on the topic.

If you have multiple allergies and are interested in how they are linked or want to find out more about food allergies outside the usual top 14 then you can follow me on Facebook or Twitter, where I share a food allergy card every day of the week.

Fig Allergy Resources

Fig is a less common food allergy – none of the allergens it contains have been recognised by the World Health Organisation.

The proteins in fig are thought to be Bet v 1 like proteins, which means that your body mistakes them for birch pollen allergens and can cause oral allergy type symptoms to them on ingestion.

I have put together some more comprehensive resources at http://www.allergyresources.co.uk/Fig.php

The allergy resources page for fig covers the key allergens, which allergic syndromes are linked to this allergy and other foods which are commonly cross reactive with fig.

There is also regularly updated links to useful websites specifically for fig allergies and the latest research papers on the topic.

If you have multiple allergies and are interested in how they are linked or want to find out more about food allergies outside the usual top 14 then you can follow me on Facebook or Twitter, where I share a food allergy card every day of the week.

Fenugreek Allergy Resources

Fenugreek (also known as methi) is a seed used to flavour food. It is a legume and there has been research to show some cross reactivity with other legumes including peanuts and soya beans.

Fenugreek contains 2S, 7S and 11S seed storage proteins as well as PR-10 plant pollen proteins.

I have put together some more comprehensive resources at http://www.allergyresources.co.uk/Fenugreek.php

The allergy resources page for fenugreek covers the key allergens, which allergic syndromes are linked to this allergy and other foods which are commonly cross reactive with fenugreek .

There is also regularly updated links to useful websites specifically for fenugreek allergies and the latest research papers on the topic.

If you have multiple allergies and are interested in how they are linked or want to find out more about food allergies outside the usual top 14 then you can follow me on Facebook or Twitter, where I share a food allergy card every day of the week.

Allergy Resources Update – April 2021

A quick update on my allergy resource website project – I thought in November that I was about a third of the way to completing it – but of course I have gone massively over the top and have begun to include a lot more including contact and inhaled allergens as well as food allergies.

You can find my website here – www.allergyresources.co.uk

I also decided that I didn’t like the colour scheme, so have made it brighter – and more accessible.

Another little screenshot for you below – the food allergy index is well populated, there are a couple of blog posts transferred from WordPress and there are some allergies by group – I will be working on the other categories over the next year!

Please go and check it out if you are struggling to find resources. I have regular updates, so if you are interested you can follow me on Facebook or Twitter to make sure you don’t miss them.

Happy researching! More updates on this project soon.

Jemma

Molluscs Allergy Resources

Molluscs are a group of invertebrates which include oysters, abalone, snails and squid. Note in Europe that molluscs and crustaceans are considered to be 2 separate food groups whose allergens need to be declared in packaged food. In the US these are both grouped under the term ‘shellfish’.

The WHO allergen index covers 6 species of molluscs linked to allergic reactions.

The main allergen in all 6 species is Tropomyosin, which is a protein found in the exoskeletons of the animals.

I have put together some more comprehensive resources at http://www.allergyresources.co.uk/Molluscs.php

The allergy resources page for molluscs covers the key allergens, which allergic syndromes are linked to this allergy and other foods which are commonly cross reactive with molluscs.

There is also regularly updated links to useful websites specifically for mollusc allergies and the latest research papers on the topic.

If you have multiple allergies and are interested in how they are linked or want to find out more about food allergies outside the usual top 14 then you can follow me on Facebook or Twitter, where I share a food allergy card every day of the week.

Mango Allergy Resources

Allergic reactions caused by eating mango are most likely to be caused by Bet v 1-like proteins, which cause reactions in people sensitised to birch tree pollen and give oral allergy type symptoms.

Mangoes also contain limonene, which is a component of the oils found in the peel of certain fruits. Limonene is a well known skin irritant – so may cause sufferers to react to the skin whilst being able to eat or drink the fruit.

I have put together some more comprehensive resources at http://www.allergyresources.co.uk/Mango.php

The allergy resources page for mango covers the key allergens, which allergic syndromes are linked to this allergy and other foods which are commonly cross reactive with mango .

There is also regularly updated links to useful websites specifically for mango allergies and the latest research papers on the topic.

If you have multiple allergies and are interested in how they are linked or want to find out more about food allergies outside the usual top 14 then you can follow me on Facebook or Twitter, where I share a food allergy card every day of the week.

Fennel Allergy Resources

Allergic reactions are most likely to be caused by Bet v 1-like proteins, which cause reactions in people sensitised to birch tree pollen and give oral allergy type symptoms.

Another suggestion is that plants in the Apiaceae family contain profilin proteins which can cause allergic reactions in uncommon circumstances.

I have put together some more comprehensive resources at http://www.allergyresources.co.uk/Fennel.php

The allergy resources page for fennel covers the key allergens, which allergic syndromes are linked to this allergy and other foods which are commonly cross reactive with fennel.

There is also regularly updated links to useful websites specifically for fennel allergies and the latest research papers on the topic.

If you have multiple allergies and are interested in how they are linked or want to find out more about food allergies outside the usual top 14 then you can follow me on Facebook or Twitter, where I share a food allergy card every day of the week.

Buffalo Milk Allergy Resources

Buffalo milk is commonly drunk in many countries and it is becoming increasingly popular in Western countries along with it’s by-products, such as buffalo mozzarella.

The allergenic proteins in buffalo milk are generally split into albumins (commonly called whey) and casein. In human milk the split is usually 60% whey to 40% casein. In buffalo milk the split is 20% whey to 80% casein. This is a very similar composition to cow’s milk. This massive difference in composition is thought to be the cause of what causes IgE allergic reaction to mammalian milk, with most people being allergic to casein proteins in the milk.

I have put together some more comprehensive resources at http://www.allergyresources.co.uk/Buffalo.php

The allergy resources page for buffalo milk covers the key allergens, which allergic syndromes are linked to this allergy and other foods which are commonly cross reactive with buffalo milk .

There is also regularly updated links to useful websites specifically for buffalo milk allergies and the latest research papers on the topic.

If you have multiple allergies and are interested in how they are linked or want to find out more about food allergies outside the usual top 14 then you can follow me on Facebook or Twitter, where I share a food allergy card every day of the week.